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Looking for a book won on a hoop-la stall 50 years ago... | 01-Mar-06

Our enquirer's father won a book of poetry and stories for her on a hoop-la stall 50 years ago! Can anyone help to identify this book?

It contained poems beginning with the following lines:

"The moon peeped in at the window
The nursery's bright and gay..."

"Oh what luck says Mrs Duck
I do like worms for tea..."

"Ferdinand Fox was happy and gay
He was going to be married the very next day..."

Also contained a story about moles, whose names all began with the letter M.

13 comments have been made on this quote. Click here to read them and then add your own!


Do you know this poem? Do you have any clues to help us find it?


Comments:

Sorry I don't know the book, but my mum used to quote the Ferdinand Fox poem to me off by heart.
Mark Warren

I, too, remember this poem from my childhood would like to find the full version of "Ferdinand Fox". I can only remember the opening lines & a couplet that goes
" He went to a shop called 'Gloves for Foxes' and he bought two pairs in fancy boxes".
Where can I find this poem ????
Peter Connolly

I'm the daughter of the lady looking for this book, my mum is 63 and loved this booked, i've have searched and searched for it, I got my mother to recall as much of the Ferdinand Fox poem for Mr Peter Connolly.

Ferdinand fox was happy and gay
he was going to be married the very next day
when all of a sudden she changed her mind
now wasn't that most unkind

I know said he, i'll buy her some gloves in fancy boxes
so he went to a shop called gloves for foxes
one in blue and one in pink
she'll marry me now I think
Ferdinan fox was perfectly right
the lady was happy, merry and bright
she was heard to say
of course i'll marry you straight away.


other poems from the book I'm looking for were

The moon peeked in at the window
the nursery was bright and gay
the toys ran out of the cupboard, shouting heray, heray
Teddy played the cymballs
Golly conducts the band
the pretty doll and the sailor boy are danciing hand in hand

But the cock crows doddle doo
here somes the morning light
the toys run back to the cupboard shouting goodnight, goodnight

Just one more poem

Oh what luck said Mrs Duck
I do like worms fro tea
But Mr Worm looked very firm
and said you won't have me
and saying that took of his hat
and down his hole went he
alas what luck poor Mrs Duck
will not have worm for tea

I would be most gratefull for any clues in hunting down this book, I can just imagine my mum's face if I managed to get it for her.

Rachel Ryder
























































Rachel Ryder

As Peter Connolly's sister, we have only recently discussed the loss of Ferdinand Fox and I can remember quite a lot more of the poem though I'm pretty sure this is not the complete work.
What I do recall is:
Ferdinand Fox was happy and gay
He was going to be married the very next day.
Then all of a sudden, she changed her mind
Now, wasn't that really most unkind!
Ferdinand Fox was gloomy and blue
What in the world was he going to do?
Then he spied a shop called 'Gloves for Foxes'
And he bought two pairs in fancy boxes
One was blue and the other was pink
Said he, "She'll marry me now, I think"
Ferdinand Fox was perfectly right,
The lady at once was filled with delight.
"What lovely gloves!" he heard her say,
"I'll marry you Ferdinand, straight away!"
Barbara Vann

It's one of those funny poems that just stick in your mind - and we (my wife and I in our fifties) still say bits occasionally for fun. My mum must have had the book I guess.
I'll repeat the poem as I remember it, which probably is not correct as it's slightly different to those above, but does include the 2 missing lines from Barbara's version.

Ferdinand Fox was happy and gay
He was going to be married the very next day
When all of a sudden she changed her mind
Now wasn't that really most unkind!

Ferdinand Fox was gloomy and blue
Now what in the world was he going to do
I'll but her a present, he thought, said he
Now let me think, what shall it be.

So he went to a shop called 'Gloves for Foxes'
And bought two pairs in fancy boxes
One was blue and the other was pink
She'll marry me now, I think.

Ferdinand Fox was perfectly right
For at once the lady was shining and bright
What lovely gloves! he heard her say
I'll marry you Ferdinand straight away
Peter Rawles

I too am looking for this book for my mum. She can resite all of Ferdinand Fox and another poem from the book Two Sleepy Little Mouses which I now tell to my children and would love to get a copy of the book for them
If you have had any sucess in finding it I would love to know

ANGELA RANDLE

I remember my mother reading that book to me when I was young I am now 57.
Oh what luck says Mrs Duck
I do like worms for tea..."
I remember the ending was something like
..but Mr worm was very firm and said you can't have me
And saying that took off his hat and down the hole went he

There was a picture of the worm taking off his hat and going down the hole!
Richard Prettyjohns

i too can remember ferdinand fox and would love to know who the author is to get a copy for my grandchildren, has anyone found the author?
vicky brown

In the attempts for Ferdinan so far, we think there is a bit missing:
Ferdinand Fox was happy and gay
He was going to be married the very next day
When all of a sudden she changed her mind!
Now wasn't that really most unkind

Ferdinand Fox was gloomy and blue;
Now what on earth was he going to do?
& then on to gloves for foxes etc
Mac Steels

Thanks Rachel Ryder for your mum's version of "Ferdinand Fox".
Sorry I've taken so long to reply. I would still like to find the full text of this poem as well as its author and history as I'd love to pass it on to my grand children. Anyone out there who can help?
peter connolly

I too had this book as a child and have tried to find it without success. My recollection of the rhyme is as follows although the penultimate line is not correct.

Ferdinand Fox was happy and gay
He was going to be married the very next day
When all of a sudden she changed her mind
Now wasn’t that really most unkind.
Ferdinand Fox was gloomy and blue
Now what in the world am I going to do?
He went to a shop called ‘Gloves for Foxes’
And bought two pairs in fancy boxes.
One was blue the other was pink
Said he, “She’ll marry me now I think”.
Ferdinand Fox then heard her say,
“I’ll marry you Ferdy and straight away.”


Anne Temple

Yes I would like to find this book too, I remember the poem about Mrs Duck, and there were others, one was _ Come let's to bed said sleepy head, tarry a while said slow. Put on the pot said greedy lot, let's sup before we go.

There was also a poem about a golly, a doll and a teddy bear.

If it is the same book, it had a red cover with a golly on the front, dressed like the one which Robertson used to advertise their jams. This was before it was not politically correct to say 'golly wog'

The book had a red cover, It was given to me by a much loved Uncle when I was about 5 years old, I think probably during or just after the war.

I am 78 years old, and would also love to find this book. I live near Hay on Wye in Powys where they have loads of second hand books. If I find it, I will ask the shop owner where it came from and if there are any more copies.

If I am successful I will contact you if you give me your e mail address. Please would you do the same for me.

By the way, there were black and white drawings in the book. I don't think there were any coloured pictures.

Thank you. Margaret Wright.


Margaret Wright

This book is called Sunshine Corner and it was written and illustrated by Violet Harford. It's one of my favourite childhood books. I used to read it with my Nan at her house when I was a little girl in the 1970s, but it was originally bought for my Dad, who was born in the 1940s. It has a red hardback cover with a picture of a golliwog, a teddy and a rabbit on the cover. My Nan also kept my Dad's copy of The Three Golliwogs by Enid Blyton. We read these two books together countless times!
Lucy Guinn


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